SRDAČICA Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae)

SRDAČICA Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae)

SRDAČICA Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae)


Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) Motherwort Leaf
Motherwort Leaf Tinctures-Liquid Herbal Extracts & Herbal Benefits

Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) is a wonderful support herb for women’s health, easing menstrual cramps, PMS and the symptoms of menopause. But it is also a great relaxant that helps to alleviate stress, depression, anxiety and nervous disorders. Used for centuries as a calmative and nervine that induces passivity in the whole nervous system, and alleviates hysteria and palpitations of the heart. It is also said to be an effective painkiller that eases headaches, and a sedative that helps to treat insomnia. As a tranquilizer, it is thought to be good for tremors, convulsions, and delirium. It is also believed to decrease thyroid function, but the plant brings balance and helps to alleviate the symptoms associated with a hyperactive thyroid.
Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) herb inherits its name from the application of use as a plant for pregnancy, birth, motherhood, and menopause. Motherwort’s use in pregnancy can also put a pregnancy in danger of termination, so be very careful if you are pregnant or seeking to become pregnant. Women who tend to have a menstrual cycle that comes on slowly and have other symptoms of PMS such as anxiety, digestive disturbances, cramps, and nervousness, have seen great benefits with the use of this herbal remedy. As an antispasmodic, it relieves stomach and menstrual cramps. It is good for other „female troubles,“ by encouraging and easing uterine contractions during childbirth and as a painkiller, easing the pain of childbirth, and menstrual-related headaches. After childbirth, it has been used to tone and restore uterine health and may help to reduce the risk of postpartum bleeding. It is strongly indicated as an herbal remedy for postpartum depression. This organic herbal tincture is also quite useful throughout motherhood, in easing the stress of children as they cycle through difficult phases. It is said to balance hormones and help in the relief of the discomforts of PMS (premenstrual syndrome), as well as the unpleasant symptoms of menopause. It can aggravate heavy bleeding, so if you are prone, use it sparingly.
Conditions of the heart and nervous system have been treated historically with Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae), as history tells us it is considered a cardiotonic as well as a nerve tonic. Due to the presence of the chemical alkaloid leonurine, a mild vasodilator, it acts as an antispasmodic to relax smooth muscle, and the heart is made up of smooth muscle. Studies performed in China found Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) to decrease clotting and the level of fat in the blood. Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) was also found to decrease clotting and the level of fat in the blood. With its calming effects, it may help to slow heart palpitations and rapid heartbeat. Mildly diuretic, it also aids in lowering high blood pressure, and most effective when it is a symptom of stress and anxiety. There is nothing subtle in the effects it has on the nervous system. Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) „gladdens the heart“ and relaxes the nervous system, which can result in elevated mood, relief of nervous debility and spasms. Higher doses are said to work as a sedative to improve sleep. Because one of the main symptoms of hyperthyroidism is heart palpitations, many herbalists believe that Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) leaf may be helpful in treating the condition. Hyperthyroidism may also lead to infertility if it is not taken care of.
Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) plant extracts have also been shown to aid in conditions with fever, where there are delirium and sleeplessness. As an antispasmodic, it has also been used for rheumatism and lung afflictions such as asthma and bronchitis.

Ingredients: Motherwort, Structured Water, 96% Alcohol.
Non-Alcohol: Motherwort, Structured Water, Vegetable Glycerin.

All of our ingredients are Certified Organic, Kosher, or Responsibly Wildcrafted. No genetically modified organisms (GMO’s) are involved. All other products that are distributed by us meet our high-quality standards.
Instructions: Use 10-20 drops in juice or water, under the tongue or as desired. May be taken 2 – 4 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
Contraindications: Pregnant women should avoid Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae), as it stimulates uterine contractions, but it may be used during labor. Those who have heart conditions should not use this herb without the advice of a physician. Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae) may produce allergic reactions to those susceptible to dermatitis. It is not recommended for people with clotting disorders, high blood pressure or heart disease without first consulting a physician. Women who have a family or personal history of cancers that are linked to higher levels of estrogen, including breast and uterine cancer, should consult a physician before using Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae).
Disclaimer: The information presented herein by Herbal Alchemy is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own healthcare provider.

Leonurus cardiaca (Lamiaceae)

 Common name: Motherwort

How used Medicinal

Activities: 424  Chemicals w/Activities: 25 All Chemicals: 47

 

Activity:

AntibacterialPesticideAntitumor

Antiinflammatory

Cancer-Preventive

Antiviral

Antioxidant

Antispasmodic

Antimutagenic

Antiulcer

Antihepatotoxic

Hepatoprotective

Antifeedant

Hypotensive

Antiseptic

FLavor

Diuretic

Anticancer

Antiedemic

Aldose-Reductase-Inhibitor

Allergenic

Antiradicular

Anticariogenic

Antinociceptive

Antiflu

Antiatherosclerotic

Insectifuge

ImmunomodulatorSedativeAntihistaminic

Candidicide

Antitumor-Promoter

Antidiabetic

Perfumery

Irritant

Antiherpetic

Analgesic

Cyclooxygenase-Inhibitor

Lipoxygenase-Inhibitor

Hemostat

Allelochemic

Antiarrhythmic

Antiaggregant

Antiperoxidant

Antihypertensive

Insectiphile

Antiasthmatic

Antinephritic

Antimalarial

Antialzheimeran

Antileishmanic

Cardiotonic

Ornithine-Decarboxylase-Inhibitor

Xanthine-Oxidase-Inhibitor

AntiarthriticHypoglycemicAntileukemic

Antistaphylococcic

AntiHIV

Anticataract

Antitumor (Lung)

Antitumor (Breast)

Vasopressor

Antidermatitic

Apoptotic

Antiallergic

Insecticide

Antitumor (Colon)

Transdermal

COX-2-Inhibitor

Hypocholesterolemic

Carcinogenic

Beta-Glucuronidase-Inhibitor

Vasodilator

Detoxicant

Herbicide

Expectorant

Antimetastatic

Antiplasmodial

Choleretic

……


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Pakovanje mL/ g:
 10 20 30 50 100 250 500 1000

Količina:
1 2 3 više 

vrh